Naval Database

| Previous Page | Next Page | Index

Archer, 1849
Type: Sloop ; Armament 14
Launched : 27 Mar 1849 ; Disposal date or year : 1866
BM: 973 tons ; Propulsion: Screw
Machinery notes: 202 h.p.
Notes:

20 Dec 1848 Deptford Building

21 Aug 1850 captured a slaver, name unknown : proceeds arising will be registered in the High Court of Admiralty on or after the 17 Sep 1852. The Jackal is noted as being a tender to the Gladiator.

4 Sep 1850 captured the slave vessel Gira Sol : proceeds arising from the capture will be registered in the high Court of Admiralty on or after the 18 Oct 1852.

16 Sep 1850 detained in Lat. 5 58' 30" N. Long. 1 51' 30" E., off Little Popoe, the Brazilian slave felucca Polka, Joaquim Nunez de Souza, master, Francisco Lourenco de Sa. Coulto, owner, which was condemned by the Vice Admiralty Court at St. Helena on 29 May 1851.

3 Feb 1851 sent to the Old Calabar River with the Jackal, to protect British lives and property, as disturbances are reported to have been caused by slaves, who outnumber freemen in the region.

7 Feb 1851 discussing the situation with local dignitaries at the Old Calabar River.

15 Feb 1851 held further meeting with leaders of the slaves and other interested parties and appear to have come to an agreement.

16 Feb 1851 arrived at Fernando Po.

Mar 1851 at the request of the British Consul, Mr. Beecroft, operations carried out against the intractable tribesmen of Bonbee and Battary who were involved in and supported the slave trade, by the ships' boats of the Archer and Jackal, during which 3 men were slightly wounded - see p. 393-4 at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow - see also copies of reports by Naval Officers in British parliamentary papers for 1852-53, available from books.google.com/

11 Mar 1851 boarded the Sardinian brig Imperio off Lagos, just arrived from Bahia, with 66 Negro passengers whose papers indicated that they were liberated slaves and were returning home : some might suggest an ideal way of arriving on the West Coast of Africa fully equipped for the slave trade - legally - says he sucking his teeth !

4 May 1851 Commander Strange, H.M. steam-sloop Archer reports that the Sylphide (late Sardinian), fore and aft schooner, succeeded in escaping from Lagos with 500 slaves, the Prometheus having been drawn away in a chase that morning, and owing to a strong westerly current, not able to sight Lagos again for two days. It is reported that the Sylphide is bound to Havana. The Sylphide having been watched for some time by our cruizers, commenced loading with palm-oil, and had a quantity on board when the Prometheus went away in chase, which led Commander Foote to believe that the intention of embarking slaves in her had been abandoned ; but, I am informed that his ship was scarcely out of sight before the oil was relanded or transferred to some other vessel, and in three or four hours the Sylphide departed from Lagos with 500 slaves.

4 Jul 1851 at Ascension.

30 Aug 1851 Coast of Africa

9 Dec 1851 off Ambriz, Angola.

15 Apr 1854 captured Russian brig Patrioten [Prize Money per London Gazette of 21 Jul 1857].

23 May 1854 detained the Dutch vessel Annechina Jantina which was sent for adjudication on 3 Feb 1855.

25 May 1854 detained the Netherland galliot De Vroux Alida, which was sent for adjudication, and sentenced on 3 Feb 1855.

25 May 1854 detained the Norwegian schooner Johanna Maria, which was sent for adjudication and sentenced on 3 Feb 1855.

30 May 1854 detained the Netherland galliot Jeanne Marie, which was sent for adjudication and sentenced on 8 Feb 1855.

1 Jun 1854 the Archer, Amphion and Conflict detained the Nornin.

3 Jun 1854 detained the Danish sloop Fortuna, which was sent for adjudication and sentenced on 12 Mar 1855.

4 Jun 1854 detained the schooner Magle.

7 Jun 1854 detained the sloop Anna Maria, which was sent for adjudication on 12 Mar 1855.

3 Sep 1854 detained the Minisna, which was sent for adjudication on 16 Mar 1855.

17 Apr 1855 the Archer and Desperate captured the Russian schooner Myran. 5 Jan 1856 preparations being made for the distribution of proceeds arising from the disposal of the schooner.

18 Apr 1855 the Archer and Desperate captured the Phoenix.

4 Feb 1856 Devonport. In Harbour

12 Feb 1856 Paymaster J. G. Barnes apptd. ; at Devonport

23 Apr 1856, Present at Fleet Review, Spithead ; Captain Heathcote

2 Oct 1858 departed England for the West Coast of Africa for anti-slavery duties.

26 Oct 1858 in lat. 14 N. long. 19 W., at noon. Sent a boarding party on board the American brig "Anglo-Saxon," of Boston, to confirm her identity, and nationality. They reported that the papers appeared to be correct, apart from the clearance from Bathurst and Gambia, which were undated, but they advised that the Mate and Master had died at Bathurst. As an aside it was interesting to note that the vessel carried a darkened binnacle such as are in common use on board slavers.

Year ending 31 Dec 1858 suffered 125 cases of sickness during the year, in addition 1 rating was invalided back to England.

8 Jan 1859 arrived at Lagos.

11 Jan 1859 arrived at the Brass River, having received intelligence at Lagos from the mail steamer Armenian that of a slave vessel might be in the River.

12 Jan 1859 departed in the ship's boats up the Brass River and found a brig, Name Unknown, supposed Juliet, without papers, flag, crew, etc., but prepared for the slave trade, and took her back out to sea, anchoring her near the Archer. It was subsequently found that anything which wasn't bolted down had been removed or stolen, or as in the case of her rigging, cut and destroyed. She was towed to Lagos with a view to sending her to Sierra Leone, but the cost of preparing here for the passage would have been too expensive so she was towed out to sea for the crew to exercise general quarters and use her for target practice, destroying and sinking her in deep water, and her case sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at Sierra Leone and on 27 Apr 1859 sentenced to be forfeited.

15 Jan 1859 returned to Lagos.

18 Jan 1859 visited Whydah.

22 Jan 1859 returned to Lagos.

3 Feb 1859 detained the slave brig Juliet in the River Nun, fully equipped for the slave trade, but her crew having fallen out, her supercargo having been murdered, the crew divided the cash on board and took the mail steamer American to Teneriffe.

5 Feb 1858 at Lagos.

22 Jul 1859 sent a cutter to watch the movements of the Stephen H. Townsend.

25 Jul 1859 boarded and examined the papers of the Stephen H. Townsend, during which time her master appeared to be nervous and much of his conversation with the boarding officer upset the Portuguese supercargo.

26 Jul 1859 the master of the S.H. Townsend destroyed the ship's flag and papers and she was therefore detained as a slave schooner name unknown. supposed Stephen H. Townsend, off Banda Point, north of Cabenda, en route to Mayumba and about to embark a cargo of 500 slaves for Cuba, and was sent to the Vice-Admiralty Court at Sierra Leone for adjudication and on 8 Sep 1859 sentenced to be condemned.

27 Jul 1859 following a chase boarded the American barque Star of the East, stated to be en route from New York to St Paul de Loanda.

9 Aug 1859 detained a slave barque name unknown, supposed Mexican barque Laura, off Banda Point, which was sent on 12 Aug to Vera Cruz i.a.w. the treaty between Mexico and GB, under the command of Lieut Pitman and a prize crew, for adjudication, the main part of the slaver's crew having been transferred to the Archer to be handed over to the Spanish and Portuguese authorities to be dealt with appropriately.

17 Aug 1859 whilst cruizing off Mayumba observed a top-sail schooner and went in chase, and after some 3 hours or so detained a slave schooner without flag or papers, name unknown, supposed Spanish schooner Juana. Having been cut down to improve her sailing qualities during the chase she was no longer considered seaworthy and was burnt, being unfit to make the journey to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena for adjudication.

18 Aug 1859 detained after a chase of some hours, whilst probably having been waiting to embark her cargo, a slave schooner, Name Unknown, supposed Maria, which was sent for adjudication.

20 Sep 1859 detained in off Ambrizette, and deserted by her crew and her name, removed from her stern by the time the Archer came up with the slave brigantine, Name Unknown, supposed Lillie Mills, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 17 Oct 1859 sentenced to be condemned.

24 Sep 1859 in the morning chased and detained a slave brigantine name unknown, supposed Eloisa, without flag or papers, in Lat. 6 43' S., long. 12 10' E., off Ambrizette, fitted out for the slave trade, which was sent to the Vice Admiralty Court of St. Helena for adjudication (and on 23 Feb 1860 sentenced to be condemned) under the command of the Boatswain, Mr. C. Blofield, with the assistance of Mr. T. H. Johnson, Naval Instructor, for navigation. During the chase the starboard boiler gave out, but the port boiler kept going until the Eloisa came within range of the 68 pounder when a few shot brought her to. The former crew were landed in the River Congo.

19 Oct 1859 River Congo, sent Lieut. J.H. Thomas on board the American brigantine Francis Ellen to check her papers, which were found to be correct.

20 Oct 1859 in the morning observed a sail at anchor off a slave brigantine name unknown, supposed Lillie Mills, without flag or papers, and detained her off Ambrizette whilst about to embark her human cargo, her crew having apparently deserted the vessel. She was sent to the Vice Admiralty Court of St. Helena for adjudication under the command of a Midshipman, Mr. Hamilton. This vessel had been boarded at an earlier date, when under the command of a Mr. Weeks, supposedly ex-RN.

Year ending 31 Dec 1859 suffered 282 cases of sickness during the year, in addition, 1 officer died and 4 officers and 14 ratings were invalided back to England.

30 Jan 1860 Captain R.W. Courtenay advised the Secretary of the Admiralty to the effect that he had detained, in Lat. 5 S., long. 11 40' E., off Black Point, a slave brigantine, Name unknown, supposed W. H. Stewart, from the little evidence that remained, 180 tons, with no papers, colours or captain, was condemned by the Vice Admiralty Court of St. Helena. The vessel had been on the coast a long time and the crew were in an awful state, the mate lying on the deck of the cabin suffering from fever, and the rest of the crew were in a miserable and emaciated state, apparently suffering from scurvy and hence they made no attempt to escape the Archer. The crew were landed at Black Point, which, whilst contrary to station orders regarding Spaniards captured on slavers, was the only option, when taking into account their condition. The mate died that evening. Had the slaves been embarked and the vessel departed for Cuba the Captain pondered the fact as to whether any of the blacks or whites would have lived to see Cuba.

27 Oct 1860 arrived at St Paul de Loanda. 19 Nov 1860 departed St Paul de Loanda for Mayemba to look for the Wrangler. 23 Nov 1860 arrived Mayemba. 23 Nov 1860 departed Mayemba for Point Padron. 24 Nov 1860 arrived Point Padron and towed the Wrangler in order that she might fetch Fernando Po. 26 Nov 1860 arrived Gaboon. 30 Nov 1860 departed Gaboon for Cape Lopez to obtain information respecting the state of the Slave Trade at Cape Lopez and procure a pilot for Sanga Tanga. 1 Dec 1860 arrive Cape Lopez. 2 Dec 1860 departed Cape Lopez for St Anne's de Cleaves, the island of St Thomas, to assist and English merchant vessel. 3 Dec 1860 arrive St Anne's de Cleaves. 5 Dec 1860 depart St Anne's for the South Coast to communicate with the Sharpshooter. 14 Dec 1860 arrive Point Padron. 14 Dec 1860 when off the River Congo, Mr. H. Grusen, Master's Assistant, reported to Captain Craufurd having, in company with Lieutenant Thomas, boarded a brigantine, and having found her to be the "Virginian," of New York, and entitled to fly the American flag, returned on board, the Captain making no complaint, and without causing any detention to the vessel. I have, &c. (Signed) H. Grusen.

16 Dec 1860 departed Point Padron for St Paul de Loanda to complete with coals.

19 Dec 1860 arrive St Paul de Loanda.

24 Dec 1860 depart for Kinsembo to communicate with the factories, and saw the US cruisers San Jacinto and Portsmouth at anchor.

25 Dec 1860 arrived Kinsembo.

26 Dec 1860 depart Kinsembo for Cabenda to communicate with the cruisers running along that coast.

28 Dec 1860 arrived Cabenda.

29 Dec 1860 depart Cabenda for Loango. On the 27th sighted Mangue Grande.

30 Dec 1860 arrived Loango.

Year ending 31 Dec 1860 suffered 309 cases of sickness during the year, in addition, 6 ratings died and 3 officers and 6 ratings were invalided back to England.

2 Jan 1861 departed for St Paul de Loanda.

4 Jan 1861 arrived St Paul de Loanda to go to the Northward to meet the mail at Loanda and make good Sharpshooter's defects.

12 Jan 1861 arrived Point Padron.

21 Jan 1861 in Fonda Bay, Captain Craufurd wrote to Commodore Edmonstone : I have to report that on the 17th instant, in latitude 6 48' south, and longitude 11 32' east, I fell in with the American brig "Nancy," of New Orleans. Having received information that a vessel of that name was expected on the coast to ship slaves, I sent an officer to ascertain her nationality. Her papers were found correct; she was therefore not detained or molested. No complaint was made by the master, and a notation was made in the ship's log, at his request. She was from Havana, bound to Congo; and there were evident signs of her being a slaver. I have, &c. (Signed) F. A. B. Craufurd.

24 Jan 1861 depart Point Padron for above Shark's Point in the R Congo.

7 Feb 1861 arrived St Paul de Loanda to meet the Sharpshooter. Found the US cruisers Constellation, Mohican, Mystic, and Sumpter.

10 Feb 1861 departed St Paul de Loanda for the R Congo.

11 Feb 1861 arrived Sharks Point in the R Congo, and remained in the Congo until 3 Mar., when she returned to Point Padron.

4 Mar 1861 arrived Cabenda, to communicate with American Flag Officer.

7 Mar 1861 departed Cabenda for the R Congo and arrived Shark's Point to hold a palaver with the Congo Chiefs, where the US gun boat Mystic was anchored.

12 Mar 1861 departed Shark's Point for the Southward.

17 Mar 1861 arrived St Paul de Loanda.

19 Mar 1861 the Wrangler arrived arrived St Paul de Loanda.

21 Mar 1861 the Forte arrived at Loanda.

23 Mar 1861 departed St Paul de Loanda, for the R Congo, having completed with coal.

25 Mar 1861 arrived Shark's Point and held a palaver with King Antonio and his Chiefs on the 27 Mar.

29 Mar 1861 departed Shark's Point to visit Point Piedras, Point Padron, and Banana, R Congo, and communicated with the French factory at Banana.

9 Apr 1861 arrived St Paul de Loanda.

13 Apr 1861 departed for the Southward to communicate with the Prometheus.

16 Apr 1861 arrived Elephant Bay.

17 Apr 1861 departed Elephant Bay for St Helena to recruit the health of crew having the fever on board.

23 Apr 1861 arrived St Helena to await the Arrogant's arrival and send invalids to hospital.

25 May 1861 departed St Helena for Ascension.

29 May 1861 arrived Ascension with the Bishop of St Helena on board for passage.

9 Jun 1861 departed Ascension for St Helena.

24 Jun 1861 arrived at St Helena to meet the Commodore.

26 Jun 1861 departed St Helena for Ascension.

29 Jun 1861 arrived Ascension to escort the Isis coal depot.

20 Jul 1861 departed Ascension for Sierra Leone. On the Archer's return to Ascension she will sail for Spithead.

Year ending 31 Dec 1860 suffered 309 cases of sickness during the year, in addition, 6 ratings died and 3 officers and 6 ratings were invalided back to England.

21 Jan 1861 in Fonda Bay, Captain Craufurd wrote to Commodore Edmonstone : I have to report that on the 17th instant, in latitude 6 48' south, and longitude 11 32' east, I fell in with the American brig "Nancy," of New Orleans. Having received information that a vessel of that name was expected on the coast to ship slaves, I sent an officer to ascertain her nationality. Her papers were found correct; she was therefore not detained or molested. No complaint was made by the master, and a notation was made in the ship's log, at his request. She was from Havana, bound to Congo; and there were evident signs of her being a slaver. I have, &c. (Signed) F. A. B. Craufurd.

22 Sep 1861 returned to England from the West Coast of Africa.

Period ending 22 Sep 1861 suffered 299 cases of sickness during the year, in addition, 10 ratings died and 2 were invalided back to England.

20 Feb 1863 Under repair at Woolwich and expected to be ready for commission on 10 Mar., when she will prepare for service on the West Coast of Africa, and employed on anti-slavery patrols. Slavery is reported to be on the increase.

30 Mar 1863 Woolwich. Commissioned for service on the West Coast of Africa.

6 May 1863 departed England for the West Coast of Africa for anti-slavery duties.

Year ending 31 Dec 1863 suffered 307 cases of sickness during the year, in addition, 2 ratings died and 4 officers and 6 ratings were invalided back to England.

1864 West Coast of Africa station. Overview and medical report of disease of the Alimentary Canal, diarrhoea, fever, pneumonia, and rheumatism onboard : number of Cases of Disease and Injury.

Year ending 31 Dec 1864 suffered 563 cases of sickness during the year, in addition, 5 ratings died and 4 officers and 10 ratings were invalided back to England.

Year ending 31 Dec 1865 suffered 494 cases of sickness during the year, in addition, 6 officers and 17 ratings died and 1 officer and 11 ratings were invalided back to England.

9 Jan 1866 returned to England from the West Coast of Africa.

Sale of machinery, boilers, &c. Contract Department, Admiralty, Somerset House, April 12, 1866 etc.....do hereby give notice, that on Tuesday, the 24th instant, at two o'clock, they will be ready to receive sealed tenders for the purchase of the machinery, boilers, &c., taken from Her Majesty's ships "Alecto," "Archer," "Bloodhound," and "Hecate," lying in Her Majesty's Dock Yard at Woolwich &c.