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Wanderer, 1835
Type: Brig-sloop ; Armament 16
Launched : 10 Jul 1835 ; Disposal date or year : 1850
BM: 428 tons
Notes:

Chatham 15 Aug 1835 is being fitted out for foreign service.

7 Oct 1835 arrived Portsmouth from Chatham.

Portsmouth 10 Oct 1835 after repairs are completed on her rudder she will sail with the Ambassador to Rio de Janeiro and thence to New York, and will remain on the North America station.

Portsmouth 24 Oct 1835 departed yesterday for Rio de Janeiro, but returned to St. Helen's. She has 60 supernumeraries onboard for the Rodney at Plymouth

Portsmouth 30 Oct 1835 departed on Tuesday for Plymouth and the South America station.

11 Nov 1835 called at Madeira en route for Brazil.

Circa 21 Feb 1836 was reported to have departed for New York.

Halifax 21 Aug 1836 is reported to be in the Bay of Fundy.

Jamaica 1 Mar 1837 cruising ; ships on the station are reported to be generally healthy

3 Apr 1837 detained in lat. 28° 30' 0" N. long. 78° 30' 0" W., off the Bahamas the Portuguese slave schooner Flor de Téjo, Joao Antonio Ribeiro, master, with 417 slaves, 94 of whom were sick, so the whole were disembarked on humanitarian grounds at New Providence. The slaver was then sent to Sierra Leone for adjudication and was condemned on 5 July, and the survivors of those that were formerly landed were emancipated.

Jamaica 3 Jul 1837 departed for Chagres.

Circa 12-24 Sep 1838 at Havana where the Carpenter, with officers from the Comus and Belvidera surveyed the Portuguese slave schooner Ingemane, recently seized by the Comus of the coast off Cuba, which whilst not fit to sail to Sierra Leone was considered fit to sail to Nassau, New Providence with 82 slaves on board.

26 Nov 1838 detained in lat. 21° 7' 0" N. long. 81° 45' 0" W., off the south coast of Cuba, the Spanish slave brig Scorpiao / Escorpion, A. Ellorriaga, master, with 250 slaves on board, who were landed at Nassau, and the vessel sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 23 Oct 1839 sentenced to be condemned.

8 May 1839 arrived Halifax with the Pique and Andromache with the 8th Regiment for Jamaica.

28 Jul 1839 arrived Portsmouth on Monday last in 18 days from Halifax, bringing a mail and departed the same day for Sheerness, to be paid off.

14 Dec 1839 Lieutenant Thomas Chaloner, and Surgeon J. W. Elliott, appointed to the Wanderer

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1840 the Sloop Wanderer, 16 guns, Complement: 115, was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced 1 Death by Accident, Total No of Deaths: 4, but regret that no reason is given for the balance.

4 Jan 1840 is fitting out in the river.

25 Jan 1840 still at Plymouth ?

1 Mar 1840 arrived Sierra Leone, Commander the Hon. J. Denman in command.

3 Mar 1840 a steady Krooman was appointed from the Wanderer to the former receiving ship Conflict as ship-keeper following the vessel being condemned as unfit for the service.

4 Mar 1840 Commander Denman appointed of his division on the Coast of West Africa vice the Commanding Officer of the Harlequin, ordered to England.

10 Mar 1840 departed on a cruise.

4 Apr 1840 detained in lat. 7° 55' N. long. 13° W. near Sierra Leone, the Spanish slave brig Eliza Davidson, Alexander B. Hanna, master, with 2 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 18 Apr 1840 sentenced to be condemned.

12 May 1840 detained the slave vessel Josephina, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at Sierra Leone and sentenced to be condemned. The vessel, however, was bought into the Service as the Josephine, later renamed Prompt.

3 Jun 1840 detained in off Gallinas the Spanish slave schooner San Paolo de Loanda, Mariano Sgitcovich, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 18 Jun 1840 sentenced to be condemned.

6 Jun 1840 cruising off Sierra Leone;

9 Jun 1840 detained in off Cape Mount, whilst en route from Havana to the Malaguetta Coast, the Spanish slave schooner Maria Rosaria, alias Traga Millas, A. Gonsales, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 24 Jun 1840 sentenced to be condemned.

13 Jun 1840 Master's Assistant Alfred Messum, appointed to the Wanderer.

3 Jul 1840 detained the slave vessel Pombinha, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at Sierra Leone and sentenced to be condemned.

11 Jul 1840 Commander Thomas Bushby, (late of the Wanderer,) promoted to the rank of captain.

13 Aug 1840 at Sierra Leone, preparing to leave for Ascension.

14 Aug 1840 detained in Sierra Leone Harbour the Spanish slave brig Republicano, F. Marengo, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone. and on 15 Aug 1840 the case was withdrawn.

16 Aug 1840 departed from Sierra Leone for Ascension and England with Mr. Commissioner Macaulay, whose health has been much impaired in recent months due to the climate here.

Sep-> 1840, the Wanderer blockaded the slave factories in the River Gallinas, the West Coast of Africa, during which period 6 prizes were taken.

Oct 1840 120 seamen and marines from the Wanderer and Saracen entered the village of Dombocorro with a view to obtaining, by treaty, the release of the slaves held by slavers in the district, under the control of Chief Siacca, and the burning of all eight slave factories. See p. 306 at at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow

11 Nov 1840 the Wanderer, with the Rolla in company detained in lat. 7° 6' N., long. 12° 17' W., whilst en route to the Gallinas, the Spanish slave brigantine Vanguardia, M. Irguierdo, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 9 Dec 1840 sentenced to be condemned.

10 Dec 1840 detained in lat. 6° 24' N., long. 12° 26' W., off Seabar, the Spanish slave schooner Reglano, M. Fernandez, master, with 349 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 23 Dec 1840 sentenced to be condemned.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1841 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced 1 Death by Accident, Total No of Deaths: 12.

11 Mar 1841 arrived at St. Mary's (Gambia) from leeward, and departed on the 20th on her return.

30 Apr 1841 at Sierra Leone.
3 Jul 1841 detained in lat. 11° 49' N. Long. 16° 49' W., the Spanish slave schooner Amalia, Dom. Cabrera, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 27 Jul 1841 sentenced to be condemned.

17-22 Jul 1841 at Goree.

24 Jul 1841 off Senegal.

28 Jul 1841 arrived at Bathurst ; departed on the 29th to leeward.

4 Sep 1841 Commander Hon. Joseph Denman (1835), of the Wanderer, promoted to captain.

4 Sep 1841 Commander Edward Norwich Troubridge, appointed to the Wanderer, vice Denman promoted ;

29 Sep 1841 off River Sinou.

16 Oct 1841 in the Roads at Sierra Leone.

1 Jan 1842 is reported to have been at Santa Cruz for the last 2 days, with the Belleisle, and troop ships Apollo, and Sapphire.

3 Feb 1842 arrived Rio de Janeiro and departed for the Cape of Good Hope on the 19th inst.

At some time during the period 1839-42 engaged in the Operations in China. Officers and Men serving on this ship during this period may be eligible for a Medal. See p. 288 at at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow

Circa Feb 1844 boats of the Wanderer and Harlequin attacked piratical settlements on the coast of Sumatra, and inflicted considerable damage, though they suffered some loss - see p. 326 at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow

4 Aug 1846 arrived at Loanda with Her Majesty's Commissioner in the Mixed British and Portuguese Commission, Sir George Jackson, K.C.H., thus enabling Mr. Edmund Gabriel, late Paymaster in the Royal Navy, to be relieved of his position as Acting Commissioner and to take up his position as Arbitrator on the part of Her Majesty's in the Mixed Commission, previously filled by the Vice-Consul, Mr. George Brand.

1 Nov 1846 Slaving - Sierre Leone - see below for report.

16 Jul 1847 detained the slave vessel Dez d'Outubro / Dez de Outubro, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at Sierra Leone, and sentenced to be condemned. 14 March 1849 slave and tonnage bounties due to be paid.

20 Dec 1848 Coast of Africa.

4 Jan 1849 detained in lat. 20° 23' N., long. 6° 18' E., the Brazilian slave schooner Subtil, 136 tons. 1 Aug 1850 tonnage bounty due now payable.


The following is an extract of a letter dated Sierra Leone, December 15, 1846 :
On the 1st ult., arrived Her Majesty's brig Cygnet, having in tow the Brazilian brigantine Paquete do Rio, of about 70 tons burden, with 647 slaves on board, captured off Sherbro on the 27th October, and brought to this port for adjudication in the Vice Admiralty Court. The following are the authentic particulars relative to this vessel :-

About the middle of last August the Paquete do Rio arrived at Sierra Leone with a cargo consisting of merchandise and rum, and having on board as passenger Mr S. P M. Campos, His Imperial Brazilian Majesty's Vice Consul at this port. After remaining a short period in this harbour, she departed to Yawry Bay; a short distance to the southward where the timber is collected, and there landed her spirits (it being out. of the jurisdiction of this colony.) After this proceeding, the Paquete do Rio again returned to Sierra Leone, whence she subsequently (on the 6th of October) departed for the southward and Rio, in ballast, and water and provisions for her passengers, twenty in number, consisting of some of the crews of former slavers. Before her departure however, she underwent a careful overhauling by an officer from the [HMS] Wanderer, but nothing could be found on board to expose her real intentions. In beating down to the southward she subsequently made acquaintance with Lieutenant __________, who boarded her, from Her Majesty's sloop Contest, on the 24th of October, off Sherbro, but even Lieutenant ________'s lynx eyes saw nothing whereby he could detain the vessel. [Lieutenant _________ , was formerly in Her Majesty's brig Lynx, and has had some experience in these matters] ; though, no doubt, from his experience, he soon guessed her in-tention. The slaver, having got safely over this last encounter, ran in for the shore, and on the evening of the 26th, or rather from the 24th to the 26th of October she shipped the whole of her equipment, water-casks, &c., with 556 slaves ! and immediately bore up for the northward, thinking I presume, to escape the Contest. In this she was successful (had she gone southward, it would not have been the case), but unluckily, Her Majesty's brig Cygnet hove in sight ; and gave chase, and, while the slaver made all sail to escape capture, a French brig of war was observed in the distance to the northward, but her Majesty's brig Cygnet was not long in coming up, and ere long the famous Paquete do Rio was a prize, and the. glad shouts of 549 human beings "were echoed o'er the briny deep," invoking blessings on. their deliverers. Many of these poor wretches were chained by iron rods passed through iron rings fastened round their necks.

Together with the slaves, numbering 549, were the passengers and crew, about 30, making in all about 579 human beings packed in a small vessel of only 70 tons. I shall dispense with giving a more detailed description of the horrible sight which presented itself, and merely state that the Cygnet arrived in Sierra Leone on the 1st November, towing the prize, which was subsequently adjudicated in the Vice-Admiralty Court .-London paper.