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Waterwitch, 1834
Type: Brig ; Armament 10
Purchased : 15 Nov 1834 ; Disposal date or year : 1861
BM: 319 tons
Notes:

18 Aug 1832 still the property of the Earl of Belfast, arrived Portsmouth from Cork in 43 hours, having been carrying out various sea trials with V.-Adm. Malcolm's squadron, consisting of the Donegal, Castor, Nimrod, Tyne, Trinculo, and the Revenue brig Prince of Wales, and was able to demonstrate her superior sailing.

18 Aug 1832 the Hampshire Telegraph notes that Mr. W. Batten's patent compressor for checking and stopping cables has been installed.

23 Nov 1832 Waterwitch carried out trials of sailing with the Pantaloon at Falmouth and off the Cornish Coast.

ex-yacht.

15 Nov 1834 the Brig Waterwitch, was purchased into the service for £3,656 0s. 0d. This info appeared on page 101 of a report dated 5 Mar 1847, detailing the vessels purchased by the Admiralty since 1830 - Accounts and Papers for the House of Commons Vol. 37.

11 Oct 1834 is reported to have been purchased into the service, from Lord Belfast.

25 Oct 1834 being fitted out at Portsmouth as a 10-gun brig.

22 Nov 1834 has been commissioned at Portsmouth.

17 Jan 1835 in harbour at Portsmouth

14 Feb 1835 in harbour at Portsmouth

28 Mar 1835 departed Spithead Thursday to cruise off Brighton.

23 Aug 1835 departed Santander with troops for Portugalette.

3 Sep 1835 arrived at St. Sebastian with Col. Wylde.

30 Sep 1835 reported to have been at Santander when the steamer Earl of Roden departed for Falmouth.

3 Dec 1835 went out to Plymouth Sound on Saturday, pending passage to the coast of Africa.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1836 the Brig Waterwitch, 10 guns, Complement: 55, was involved in combatting the Slave Trade - 1 death by accident, total No. of Deaths: 2.

6 Feb 1836 detained in lat. 5° 35' 0" N. long. 4° 20' 0" E. the slave vessel El Cazador Santurzano / El Cazador Santurzano, Angel de Elloriaga, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone and on 23 Aug 1836 sentenced to be condemned.

13 Mar 1836 detained in lat. 6° 11' 0" N. long. 1° 37' 0" E., off Little Popo, the Spanish slave vessel Galana Josefa, Francisco Antonio Sarrico, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone and on 27 Sep 1836 sentenced to be condemned.

14 Mar 1836 detained in lat. 5° 57' 0" N. long. 2° 22' 0" E., the Spanish slave schooner Joven Maria, José Garay, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 27 Sep 1836 sentenced to be condemned.

28 Mar 1836 reported to be at Prince's Island. Her good sailing qualities appear to be paying dividends.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1837 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade and experienced 8 Deaths.

6 Aug 1837 detained in the Bight of Benin, off Cape Formosa, in lat. 4° 30' N., long. 4° 20' W., the Portuguese slave brig Amelia, Manoel José Marcial, master, with 359 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Portuguese Court of Mixed Commission, Sierra Leone, and on 30 Aug 1837 sentenced to be condemned.

28 Sep 1837 detained in lat. 3° 47' 0" N. long. 8° 42' 0" E., off Fernando Po, the Portuguese slave schooner Vibora de Cabo Verde, Joaquim Antonio, master, with 269 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Portuguese Court of Mixed Commission, Sierra Leone, and on 13 Nov 1837 sentenced to be condemned. The vessel is probably the former American schooner Viper, which late last year was reported departing Havana for the Cape de Verdes. The surviving 221 slaves were emancipated, 48 having died following the capture of the vessel, due to dysentery and the poor conditions on board.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1838 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade - 15 Deaths.

Per a report made to Parliament in 1842, at some time during 1839 was involved in combatting the Slave Trade. Her complement had been increased to 60.

16 Feb 1839, Portsmouth, it is reported that she will be ready for commission on 28th inst. [One wonders if this is merely opinion ? Per Times from Hampshire Telegraph].

16 Mar 1839 Portsmouth, in Harbour.

20 Apr 1839 Portsmouth, in Harbour.

25 Apr 1839 Portsmouth, departed for Plymouth, Lt Matson in command. It is also added that her destination is the Cape of Good Hope and that she carries disposable men, otherwise known as supernumeraries, for the Cape and African station.

22 May 1839 per a letter of 30 May 1839, arrived Sierra Leone following a passage of 27 days from Plymouth.

24 May 1839 Sierra Leone, departed on a cruise off the Galenia Islands, [per above letter].

27 May 1839 detained in lat. 6° 50' 0" N. long. 11° 50' 0" W., when bound from Gallinas to Cuba, following a long chase, the Spanish slave felucca Si, Gaspar Roig, master, with 360 slaves, during which it was necessary to fire on the vessel to bring her to, when one of her crew and a Negro slave were killed, and two crew wounded. Returned to Sierra Leone with the prize for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 5 Jun 1839 sentenced to be condemned and for the emancipation of her human cargo. 16 May 1844 prize money arising due for payment.

30 May 1839 departs Sierra Leone tonight for the Bight of Benin.

8 Jul 1839 detained in lat. 4° 20' N. long. 4° 40' E., after a long chase, off Cape Formosa, whilst en route from the Portuguese slave schooner Constitucao, aka Dolphin, Antonio Rodrigues, master, with 344 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 24 Jul 1839 sentenced to be condemned.

27 Sep 1839 detained in lat. 5° 55' N. long. 30° 20' E., the Portuguese slave schooner Sete d'Abril / Avril, formerly the Mary Cushing, Manoel Martinho, captain of the Portuguese flag, with 424 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and sentenced to be condemned.

3 Oct 1839 whilst in Lagos Roads a suspicious vessel, a brigantine, was noticed and the cutter headed towards her to carry out an inspection, however, the vessel, seeing the approaching vessel, slipped and made sail, firing a volley of musketry, and not showing any colours. Fire was returned and an unsuccessful attempt was made to follow her, and she eventually escaped, the cutter having received 11 hits, but fortunately not a man was hurt. The Waterwitch, having noticed that the brigantine had slipped, chased her until the following day, but having men away as prize crews was unable to man her sweeps in order to catch the vessel.

8 Oct 1839 off Princes Island, on the West Coast of Africa. 27 Oct 1839 detained in lat. 5° 50' 0" N. long. 1° 38' 0" E., off Cape St. Paul's, the Brazilian slave schooner Calliope, S. J. Pereira, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Brazilian Court of Mixed Commission, Sierra Leone, and on 3 Dec 1839 sentenced to be condemned.

1 Nov 1839 detained in lat. 6° 20' 0" N. long. 4° 20' 0" E., off Lagos, after a long chase, having thrown overboard everything possible and would not stop until her her masts and rigging were so damaged by the Waterwitch's gunnery that she could no longer carry any sail, the Portuguese slave brig Fortuna, J. A. Barboza, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 3 Dec 1839 sentenced to be condemned.

14 Mar 1840 detained the slave vessel Cabaca, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be condemned.

28 May 1840 detained the slave vessel Andorinha.

13 Jul 1840 detained the slave vessel Maria Rita, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 29 Feb 1844.

31 Jul 1840 Woolwich, Mr. John D. Barnes has been appointed clerk-in-charge of the Waterwitch, vice Brickwood, whose warrant has been cancelled.

Circa Sep 1840 was spoken to latitude 6 S.

19 Oct 1840 off Angola.

13 Nov 1840 detained the slave vessel Doze d'Autobro, supposed, Name Unknown.

2 Dec 1840 detained a slave vessel, Name Unknown, supposed Nove Irmaus, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at British Guiana and sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 31 Oct 1843.

8 Jan 1841 the Waterwitch, in company with the Fantome and Brisk, detained in lat. 8° 40 0 S. Long. 13° 0' 0 E., the Brazilian slave brig Orozimho / Orozimbo, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Brazilian Court of Mixed Commission, Sierra Leone, and on 11 Jan 1841 sentenced to be condemned. Tonnage bounty and moiety of proceeds of the brig ready for payment 19 Jan 1843.

23 Jan 1841 arrived at St. Helena from the coast of Africa.

19 Feb 1841 arrived at the Cape of Good Hope.

28 Mar 1841 left the Cape for the Mozambique.

13 Apr 1841 detained the slave vessel Euro, the property of A.P.P. de Campo, President of the Legislative Council & principal Slave Merchant in Angola, with 314 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 31 Oct 1843.

16 Apr 1841 off Ambriz, having just returned from the Cape, where she had her copper repaired.

2 May 1841 detained, off Mazala, Angola, a slave brigantine with no papers or colours, Name Unknown, but supposed to be the Flor de Loanda, equipped for the slave trade, her crew having abandoned her, although a Portuguese ensign was subsequently discovered, along with a private letter which suggested that she might be the Flor de Loanda. Papers ordered by Parliament circa 1846/47 when it asked for a return of all sums of money paid by the Crown to or on behalf of captors ie in this instance £14 13s. 9d., in satisfaction or indemnification of expenses or damages arising from the prosecution or seizure of vessels alleged to be engaged in the Slave Trade, from 1807.

30 Jun 1841 arrived off Benguella and anchored, and discovered that the Governor had recently left for Loanda, and that the place was in the charge of Mr Joao Almeida, the principal slave merchant, and there were no signs of any constituted authority, such as colours over the fort &c., and several slave vessels were preparing for sea. Under the circumstances proceeded to search the vessels in the Roads and finding the Brazilian brigantine Donna Elliza, A. de Silva Monteiro, master, fully equipped for the slave trade, seized her and sent her for adjudication to the British and Brazilian Court of Mixed Commission, Sierra Leone, and on 3 Aug 1841 sentenced to be condemned. Having detained this vessel Lieut Matson then goes on in his letter to the Flag Officer of the station "to trust that I have not exceeded my instructions in searching for slave vessels in an open Roadstead, where the authorities are only nominal and who scarcely keep up appearance of obeying any laws whatever."

11 Jul 1841 arrived St. Helena to pick up two prize crews, the commander being the only officer on board. On the 20th of June she had captured the Donna Elliza, a Brazilian, fitted for receiving slaves, from under the forts of Benguala, and had sent her to Sierra Leone, in charge of the gunner, for condemnation. The Waterwitch was to leave St. Helena, to return to her station, on the 14th. I note that Lieut Matson wrote to the Secretary of the Admiralty regarding a number of captures he'd made recently, and hoping for their approval, but note that the capture of this vessel ie the Donna Eliza, apparently in Portuguese waters doesn't seem to have gone down too well, although the Admiralty don't appear to have received all the facts yet !

3 Aug 1841 the ships boats, under Mr. James Wilcox, mate, chased for 6 hours and detained the Portuguese brigantine Carisco, with 392 slaves onboard, that had been embarked in the Roads at Benguala. The prize was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena in charge of Mr. Sturdee, and was sentenced to be condemned on 23 Aug 1841. 31 Oct 1843 Slave and Tonnage Bounties due for payment.

11 Sep 1841 Lt Matson wrote advising that he had anchored at Benguala, and that the following day the Assistant Surgeon, Mr Andrew B. Curror, and Mr John O. Barnes, Clerk in Charge, landed to leave a letter for either of the cruisers arriving there in the absence of the Waterwitch. Shortly after landing they were arrested and sent back on board the Waterwitch as prisoners, and on my landing to ascertain the meaning of this I was myself arrested, paraded through the town, in the centre of a guard of Negro soldiers and taken to the residence of the Governor, who treated me with every possible rudeness and contempt. His object in doing this was sufficiently evident viz. to insult us in the most public manner and by exciting the feelings of the populace against us, encouraging them to commit any excess in revenge for our interference with their Trade. The Governor derives a considerable income by giving protection to slave vessels and allowing them to embark slaves under the guns of the fort, which circumstance I have already brought to your attention, and it now being reported that he receives $2,000 per slave vessel departing with a cargo of slaves, although some slave dealers are reputed not to bother with the bribery. Knowing the feeling which exists against British Officers in general, I have communicated with that place as seldom as possible, not any person belonging to the Waterwitch has landed there on duty during the 20 months I have been on the Coast and I should not then have landed myself had it not been for the insult offered to two of my officers.

1 Oct 1841 above letter continues....anchored at Loanda had a long conversation with the Governor General concerning my having taken the Donna Eliza from the Roads at Benguala.

20 Oct 1841 detained in about lat 8° 9' S. ; 10° 1' E. the cutter Donna Francisca, 22 tons, armed with 2 swivels, Antonio Barrete d'Almeide, master, declared the vessel bound from Princes Isle to Benguala with a crew of 10 men, 1 boy, and 5 passengers, which, after examination was thought to be fitted out for the slave trade and was sent for adjudication to Vice-Admiralty Court, St. Helena, appeared Lieut Henry James Matson, and sentenced to be condemned on 15 Nov 1841.
An examination of the vessel showed that she appeared to be fitted out to carry slaves, having large quantities of water in the hold, stowed level for the Slave Deck, and ready for the mats, of which she was carrying far more than would have been required for the crew ; in addition she was carrying an extraordinary quantity of farinha, usually fed to the Africans in these circumstances, and far in excess of what would have been required for her crew. The report includes a list of the crew and passengers which suggest that the d'Almeide family were well represented. The usual questions to be asked of the master, along with the answers are also provided, and since it is appears to be fairly readable I'll include a copy here. This and more can be found at about page 250 in FO 84-437 Admiralty Letters 1842 Jan., available at the National Archives for free download, including an additional question and answer session in court with respect to a slave that was found on board the Donna Francisca when she was detained, 2 having been dropped off at St Thomas' ;-) and a 6 pdr cannonade.
Prize money due for payment 29 Feb 1844.
As a rider to the above it would appear that there may have been some problems with the detention of this vessel, although probably of a minor nature, since a charge of £6 17s. 0d. came to light in papers ordered by Parliament circa 1846/47 when it asked for a return of all sums of money paid by the Crown to or on behalf of captors, in satisfaction or indemnification of expenses or damages arising from the prosecution or seizure of vessels alleged to be engaged in the Slave Trade......from 1807, but regret I have no further info on the matter, although there might be something in the Foreign Office papers if you'd care to browse through them.

24 Oct 1841 the Fantome, returned to Simon's Bay, following a cruise off the coast of Angola, for the suppression of the slave trade, reports having had the Brisk and Waterwitch under her orders, during which period they captured 33 slave vessels ; Fantome, 16 ; Brisk, 10 ; and Waterwitch, 9.

27 Oct 1841 detained in lat. 9° 10' S. Long. 9° 40' E., the Brazilian slave barque Ermelinda, J. A. de Carvalho Coutinho, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Brazilian Court of Mixed Commission, Sierra Leone, and on 20 Jan 1842 sentenced, albeit she was patently involved in the slave trade, to be restored to her Master, the Brazilian judge not agreeing with the original judgment and the case going to arbitration, the lot falling on the Brazilian Commissioner. A note in the Hampshire Telegraph of 24 Jan 1842 reports that the vessel was carrying a London built carriage that cost £400, and a pair of handsome greys, supposedly as a bribe from the slave merchant.

9-14 Nov 1841 at St Helena per letter written by Lt Matson, and having completed her water, refitted, and is sailing for Ascension as instructed by Commander Adams, where he remains 48 hours, before departing for his station.

30 Dec 1841 detained in the Bay of Luango a slave Boat, Name Unknown, which case was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be Restored to her Master. See below for details for vessel detained on 21 Jan 1842 for a similar case. For the facts for this case ie the source material, see pp 195-198 in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. And later in FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Pronounced not to have been at time of seizure equipped for seizure."

31 Dec 1841 detained the slave vessel Feliz Triumvirato, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 12 Dec 1842 sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 16 May 1844.

21 Jan 1842 detained in the Bay of Cabenda a slave Boat, Name Unknown, Sandindo Ramorro, master, which case was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be Restored to her Master. See details below.
In the Vice-Admiralty Court, St. Helena, before his honour William Wilde Esq., judge and commissary thereof lawfully constituted and appointed.
Our Sovereign Lady the Queen against a certain boat or vessel Name Unknown in hereof Sandindo Ramorro was master, her tackle, apparel and furniture, and the cargo laden therein taken and seized by Henry J Matson Esq., commander of HM brig Waterwitch.
16 Jun 1842 Appeared personally James Willcox Esq., Senior Mate of HBM brig Waterwitch, whereof James Matson is commander, duly authorised and empowered according to the provisions of the Act of Parliament 2d and 3d of Victoria Ch 73., to capture Portuguese vessels engaged in the Slave Trade, and other vessels engaged in the Slave Trade not being justly entitled to claim the protection of the flag of any state or nation, and being duly sworn made Oath and said that he, this deponent on the 21st day of January 1842, being in the Bay of Kabenda, on the West Coast of Africa in command of the gig of HM said brig pursuant to the orders of the said HJ Matson, captured an open boat or vessel without colours or ship papers of any description, having on board an extraordinary quantity of provisions beyond what might probably be requisite for the use of the crew of the said vessel as a merchant vessel, and commanded by Sandindo Ramorro, who declared the said vessel to be bound from the River Congo to Kabenda for Ramoa Raminosa, a Spanish slave merchant. And this deponent further said that upon the evidence of the said boat or vessel being engaged in the slave trade and from the impracticability of sending the said vessel to St Helena for adjudication, she the said vessel, persuant to orders received by HJ Matson, and by him communicated to the deponent surveyed and destroyed. Jas. Willcox. On the 16th day of June 1842, the above named Jas Willcox was duly sworn to the truth of the foregoing affidavit, before me W Wilde, Judge, VAC.
Janisch exhibited the above affidavit and prayed a monition against Sandindo Ramorro and against all persons in general which the judge granted.
11 Jul 1842 A court holden this day. In pain of parties cited not appearing Janisch referred to the monition heretofore brought in duly executed, and also the affidavit of Jas Willcox Esq., Sen Mate of the Waterwitch, heretofore exhibited and remaining in the registry of this court.
The Judge having heard the said affidavit read and the motion of Janisch on behalf of HM, pronounced the said boat or vessel not to have been at the time of seizure therefore equipped for the Slave Trade or actually employed in the transfer of Negroes or others for the purpose of consigning them to slavery, and further pronounced the cargo to be not subject to forfeiture and condemnation. Jno N Firmin, Registrar. See pp 188-192 in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. See letter sent by Judge W Wilde to Their Lordships at the Admiralty regarding his reasons for refusing to condemn these small boats. And later in FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Pronounced not to have been at time of seizure equipped for seizure."

8 Feb 1842 detained 2 slave boats, Names Unknown, containing 59 Slaves, which cases were sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be condemned. Slave and Tonnage Bounties, and excess of expenses allowed by H.M.s Treasury due for payment 16 May 1844.

8 Feb 1842 detained an open slave boat, Name Unknown, with 3 of her crew, without colours or papers, with 50 slaves on board. On 20 Apr 1842 Able Seaman John Wolf was sworn in by the Court and reported that the master and remainder of the crew had jumped overboard and swum ashore at the moment of capture. On 2 May 1842 James Willcox, Senior Mate of the Waterwitch was also sworn in. The vessel was ordered to be destroyed by the Commanding Officer of the Waterwitch, Lieut H. J. Matson, the case being sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and where the boat was condemned on 16 May 1842. See p 118-> in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. 16 May 1844 Slave and Tonnage Bounties, and excess of expenses allowed by H.M.s Treasury due for payment.

8 Feb 1842 detained an open slave boat, Name Unknown, Antonio de la Puenta, master, without colours or papers, with 9 slaves. The master declared that the boat was bound from Malembo to Loango and that the slaves were to be embarked on board a Portuguese brig at Loango. On 20 Apr 1842 Able Seaman John Wolf was sworn in by the Court ; also, on 2 May 1842 James Willcox, Senior Mate of the Waterwitch was also sworn in. The case being sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and where the boat was condemned on 16 May 1842. See p 106-> in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. Slave and Tonnage Bounties, and excess of expenses allowed by H.M.s Treasury due for payment 16 May 1844.

9 Feb 1842 detained an open slave boat, Name Unknown, without colours or papers, with a crew of 8 men, natives of Kabenda. The said boat having been seen by the deponent, Able Seaman John Wolf, immediately prior to capture, when she landed between 50 to 60 slaves, who, with a part of her crew and 2 white men, proceeded along the beach towards Loango. The vessel was ordered to be destroyed by the Commanding Officer of the Waterwitch, Lieut H. J. Matson, the case being sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and where the boat was condemned on 16 May 1842. See p 106-> in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. Slave and Tonnage Bounties, and excess of expenses allowed by H.M.s Treasury due for payment 16 May 1844.

10 Feb 1842 chased by the Waterwitch in about lat 4° 20' S ; lon 11° 26' E., a slave brig, Name unknown, supposed Himmaleh, eventually being run ashore and deserted by her crew, where Frederick Renney Sturdee, Second Master of the Waterwitch, was ordered by Lieut H. J. Matson to proceed on board the brig to examine her and reported that she was fitted out with all the paraphernalia required by a vessel involved in the Slave Trade, as detailed in Act of Parliament 2d and 3d of Victoria Ch 73, along with 2 Portuguese and 2 American ensigns, but no documents found. Under normal circumstances she would have been refloated and taken to St Helena to be condemned, but being unable to refloat her she was set on fire and burnt down to her bottom timbers. On 16 Jun 1842 Mr Sturdee was sworn in as a deponent at the Vice-Admiralty Court, St. Helena, where the brig was condemned on 11 Jul 1842. See pp 172-176 in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. And later in FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Pronounced to have been liable to forfeiture at the time of seizure." Prize money due for payment 1 Aug 1844.

11 Mar 1842 [By Ed. Since much of the evidence in this case is confusing and doesn't make much sense, or is missing ie 144, 146-147 being duplicated and page 145 missing and in addition the judge is unhappy with the evidence and calls a halt to proceeding, the evidence in his opinion not complying with the recently introduced legislation ie 2° & 3° Victoriae, cap. LXXIII (73), An Act for the Suppression of the Slave Trade 1839, and he sums up arguing that Cargo should not to be subject or liable to forfeiture or condemnation. I would therefore suggest that you transfer the salient details of this case to the one above for 21 Jan 1842, which is almost identical, and even if the first page is duplicated everything else seems to be there in order and it all makes sense.
So, for what its worth, here is some of the evidence that I could deduce for this case until a halt was called to proceedings…."page 144 refers to the capture of an open boat or vessel, name unknown, manned by natives of Kabenda, and being equipped for or engaged in the slave trade, having"……next page (p. 145) missing.
Page 146 kicks off with "His honour postponed judgment in this case until further proof should be addressed."
The next paragraph in Page 146, probably dated 20 June 1842 details the evidence of the Commanding Officer of the Waterwitch Henry James Matson Esquire :
"Appeared personally Henry James Matson Esquire, commander of HM brig Waterwitch duly authorised and empowered according to the provisions of the Act of Parliament 2d & 3d Victoria, ch 73, to make seizures of Portuguese vessels engaged in the Slave Trade, and other vessels engaged in the Slave Trade not being justly entitled to claim the protection of the Flag of any State or Nation, and being dult sworn made oath and said that on the 11th day of March whilst cruising off the West Coast of Africa a signal was made by James Willcox, esquire, Senior Mate of and belonging to HM said brig, at some distance from her, the said brig that a vessel was in sight ; that there from this deponent made sail and immediately gave chase, but that it being already late in the day and getting dark, he, this deponent, soon lost sight of the said vessel, which in consequence escaped ; that upon his, this deponent coming up with the said prize, he was informed by the said James Willcox, that he had captured an open boat or vessel having on board a quantity of mats, larger than was necessary for the use of the said crew of the said boat or vessel as a merchant vessel and this deponent further said that the Coxswain in command of the said boat" (p 146 repeats itself).
P 147 continue….."boat or vessel informed the deponent, that the vessel for which he was deponent had just then given chase, and which had escaped was the slave brig Volador, and that he the said Coxswain had been sent with the said boat or vessel and the said mats to the said brig Volador, with verbal directions to the master of the said brig by Don Pedro Manegat. And this deponent further said that the said Don Pedro Manegat is well known to him this deponent as a noted dealer in slaves. Signed H J Matson." On the 20 Jun 1842 the above named, Henry James Matson was duly sworn to the truth of the foregoing Affidavit before me. "W Wilde", Judge, V.A.C.
Continuing P 147 on what appears to be about the 11 Jul 1842 "A Court holden this day."
"In pain of parties cited not appearing Janisch referred to the monition heretofore brought in duly executed and also to the Affidavits of HJ Matson Esq, CO of the Waterwitch, and Jas Willcox, Sen Mate of the said brig heretofore exhibited and remaining in the Registry of this Court."
The Judge having heard the said Affidavits read, and the motion of Janisch on behalf of HM pronounced the said boat or vessel," Page 147 ends.
P 148 "not to have been at the time of the seizure thereof equipped for the Slave Trade, or actually employed in the transport of Negroes or others for the purpose of consigning them to slavery and further pronounced the Cargo not to be subject or liable to forfeiture or condemnation. Jno N Firmin, Registrar." For the original material see pp 178-186 in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., and later in FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Pronounced not to have been at time of seizure equipped for seizure."

17 Mar 1842 detained a slave Boat, Name Unknown, which case was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be Restored to her Master. See above for details for vessel detained on 21 Jan 1842 for a similar case. For the facts for this case ie the source material, see pp 200-205 in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. And later in FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Pronounced not to have been at time of seizure equipped for seizure."

6 Apr 1842 detained in about lat 7° 50' S., long 12° 59' the Portuguese slave brigantine, Name Unknown (No. 7), discovered when deserted by her crew, without papers, but having a Portuguese flag on board, and being equipped for the slave trade with the usual large quantities of food and water, far in excess of the requirements of a normal crew, this being in addition to the large number of shackles, matting and other items that means that the vessel could only have been used for one purpose. Having inspected the vessel the Mate of the Waterwitch, James Willcox ordered Midshipman Henry Stanley Jackson, of the Waterwitch to take the vessel for adjudication at the Vice-Admiralty Court, at St. Helena, where she arrived on the 20 Apr 1842. The following day Midshipman Henry Stanley Jackson and on the 2 May James Willcox, senior mate of the Waterwitch were sworn in as witnesses or deponents at the Court, where the vessel was condemned on 2 May 1842. Prize money due for payment 31 Oct 1843.

9 Apr 1842 detained in about lat 8° 11' S., long 12° 11' the Portuguese slave brigantine Africano, 88 tons, Jose Fransisco Ruoa, master, which was examined and found to be fitted out for the slave trade and sent for adjudication by the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena, commanded by James Willcox, senior Mate of the Waterwitch, where the Africano arrived on 26 Apr 1842 and was sentenced on the 16 May 1842 to be condemned. The master of the Africano stated that she was bound from Rio de Janeiro to Ambriz with a crew of 13 men, names unknown. See p 99-> in FO 84-441 Admiralty Letters 1842 Sept-Oct., free download from the National Archives. Prize money due for payment 31 Oct 1843.

31 May 1842 in company with the Madagascar was involved in the destruction of the slave barracoons and the liberation of slaves at Ambriz, and paid a sum as voted by Parliament for services performed.

22 Jun 1842 it is interesting to note that Captain Foote, commanding officer of the Madagascar, the current senior officer on the Coast of West Africa, is complaining to the Governor General at St Paul de Loando regarding the late arrest by a number of Portuguese soldiers of Lieutenant Matson, commanding officer of the Waterwitch, when walking through the town of Benguela. I guess he must be doing his job well, and that with so many of the Senior people in Angola involved in the slave trade he's rattling some cages ?......;-) 22 Jul 1842 detained in lat 2° 0' S., long 2° 25' E., the Portuguese slave vessel Triumfo, Pedro Juan Oito, and bound from Rio de Janeiro to Loango, with a crew of 9 men and 1 boy. However, it is noted in a letter from the Coast of Africa dated 15 Aug 1842 that the vessel was very leaky and 4 days after capture, and the vessel having been survey on the 27 Jul and decreed to be fully fitted for the slave trade, but totally unseaworthy and unsafe and was therefore measured and burnt in about lat 2° 20' S., long 6° 22' E., that day and the case being sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on the 1 Sep Mr. Richard Acheson Burstall, master's mate was sworn in as a deponent and after hearing the evidence from the parties involved on 22 Sep 1842 the vessel was condemned : see FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Pronounced to have been liable to forfeiture at the time of seizure," and was condemned.

7 Aug 1842 detained off Ambriz the Portuguese slave brigantine Bella Indianna, the master, it was reported by the crew, having died on passage from Rio de Janeiro to Angola, the brigantine, being described as fully equipped for the slave trade, was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena under the command of Mr. Burstall, where she arrived on the 29 Aug 1842, and on 22 Sep 1842 was sentenced to be condemned. See FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Condemned for being equipped for the Slave Trade." Prize money due for payment 29 Feb 1844.

11 Aug 1842 detained at Dandie by one of the ship's boats, off the West Coast of Africa the Portuguese slave schooner Nossa Senhora da Juda, latteen rigged, Antonio Soarez de Almeida, master, with 63 slaves on board, but without papers or colours. The vessel was found to be totally unfit for the passage to St Helena so her crew and the slaves were transferred to the Waterwitch and from thence to the Acorn, then bound for St Helena, where they arrived on the 2 Sep 1842, for adjudication of the case at the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 22 Sep 1842 sentenced to be condemned having heard the evidence of the witnesses, including AB John Pocock. See FO 84-443 Admiralty Letters 1842 Dec., free from the National Archives 11 Jul 1842 was "Pronounced to have been liable to forfeiture at the time of seizure - Slaves condemned to Her Majesty." and was condemned. Prize money due for payment 29 Feb 1844.

20 Aug 1842 detained a small slave vessel, Name Unknown, with 63 slaves on board, according to an extract from a letter received by the Hampshire Telegraph, dated 28 Nov 1842. No further details known for this vessel.

28 Aug 1842 detained off Nova Redonda, the slave schooner Gentil Africano, of 144 tons, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 12 Dec 1842 sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 1 Aug 1844.

21 Sep 1842 the ship's boats under the command of Mr. Sturdie, Second Master, detained the large slave brigantine Duqueza de Mindillo, in Elephant Bay, when ready to embark 400 slaves waiting ashore, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 17 Nov 1842 sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 16 May 1844.

12 Nov 1842 detained the slave vessel Josefina, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 1 Aug 1844.

3 Apr 1843 detained a slave brigantine, Name Unknown, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 22 May 1843 sentenced to be condemned.

27 Apr 1843 detained the slave vessel Almeida, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 1 Jun 1843 sentenced to be condemned.

23 May 1845 detained in Lat. 5° 45' N Long. 10° 5' W., the Spanish slave schooner Venganza, Martin Urriola, master, which was sent for adjudication to the British and Spanish Mixed Court of Justice, Sierra Leone, and on 10 Jun 1845 sentenced to be condemned.

10 Apr 1846 detained in lat. 4° 56' S. long. 11° 37' E., the Brazilian slave brig Gabriel, Manoel Jozé Teixeira, master, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 14 May 1846 sentenced to be condemned.

1 May 1846 detained in lat. 4° 34' S. long. 11° 30' E., the Brazilian slave brig Caxias, Antonio Francisco da Costa, master, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 11 Jun 1846 sentenced to be condemned.

8 May 1846 detained off Loango Bay a slave brigantine, Name Unknown, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 6 Jul 1846 sentenced to be condemned.

4 June 1846-47 paid to the officers and crew £310 0s. 0d., the value of a brigantine, Name Unknown, captured by H.M. brig Waterwitch, and taken into Her Majesty's colonial service.

11 Jun 1846 detained whilst at anchor off the Island of St. Helena the Brazilian slave brigantine Emprehendedora, Francisco Rodrigues da Silva, master, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 6 Aug 1846 sentenced to be restored to her Master.

13 Sep 1846 detained in lat. 10° 12 S. long. 3° 11' E., a slave brig, Name Unknown, with no colours or papers, and with 546 negroes, a great many of them children, and suffering dreadfully from the excessively cramped conditions, over 100 being transferred to the Waterwitch, and both vessels departed for the adjudication of the resulting case to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena, where they arrived on the 18 Sep., and the slave vessel was sentenced to be condemned. 21 Jul 1848 slave and tonnage bounties due for payment.

10 Jan 1847 detained the slave vessel Selina, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be condemned. Prize money due for payment 1 Dec 1848.

12 Jun 1847 detained a slave brig, Name Unknown, supposed Beulah, with 514 slaves on board, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at Sierra Leone and sentenced to be condemned. 14 Feb 1849 Slave and Tonnage bounties etc. due to be paid.

22 Jul 1847 the Waterwitch, in company with the Rapid, detained the slave vessel Romeo Primeiro, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at Sierra Leone and sentenced to be condemned - proceeds of Tonnage Bounty due for payment 2 May 1849 - see p. 366 at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow for more detail.

6 Aug 1847 detained a slave brigantine, Name Unknown, 69¾ ft. long, 18½ ft. broad, 10 ft 1¼ in. deep ; 100 tons (foreign), which, being unseaworthy was destroyed, and the case sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena where she was condemned. 13 Apr 1849 proceeds of Tonnage Bounty and two Chronometers due to be paid.

12 Aug 1847 detained the slave vessel Adelaide, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and sentenced to be condemned. 13 Apr 1849 proceeds of Hull, &c., and Tonnage Bounty due to be paid.

16 October 1847-48 officers and crew paid £24 15s. 2d. in respect of expenses attending the capture of a brig, name unknown, at St. Helena.

16 October 1847-48 officers and crew paid £42 9s. 10d. in respect of expenses attending the capture of another brig, name unknown, at Sierra Leone.

13 January 1847-48 officers and crew paid £123 3s. 0d. in respect of excess of expenses above the proceeds of the vessel, name unknown, taken to St. Helena.

Jan 1848 Chatham.

Jun-Jul 1848 Off the Slave Coast (Sierra Leone). See the vessel Amphitrite for article from the Morning Chronicle, for 11 Sep 1848.

20 Dec 1848 Coast of Africa.

3 Feb 1849 assembled a squadron off Gallinas, consisting of the Penelope, Favorite, Sealark, Waterwitch, Bonetta, Dart and Pluto. Boats from the squadron with 300 men passed the bar at 7.30. a. m., and landed at Dombocorro, took possession of it, and the neighbouring factories and barracoons...whilst the boats of the Penelope, pushed on to the Solyman factories, and the village of Dreesing, were totally destroyed. Commander Murray also conducted a party to Mineh, and destroyed the factories and barracoons which it contained. On the 4th the three large factories in the vicinity of Dombocorro were destroyed, along with Dombocorro itself, with all its contents, was burnt to the ground, and by sunset, the force had returned to their respective ships, without a single casualty (representing a summary of Commodore Hotham's report on the event).

10 Jul 1849 detained in lat. 7° 10' N. Long. 11° 50' W., a slave schooner, Name Unknown.

15 Jul 1849 detained a slave vessel, Name Unknown.

22 Sep 1849 detained off Whydah in lat. 3° 35' N. Long. 4° 11' E., the Brazilian slave vessel Despique.

15 Nov 1849 detained off Red Point, on the West Coast of Africa a slave schooner, Name Unknown, flag unknown, L. 51 ft., B. 16 ft., D. 8 ft., fitted out as a slave trader, and half full of water and declared unseaworthy, she was burnt after a bitt-head and two shackles were removed and taken to St. Helena for the adjudication.

27 Nov 1849 detained off the River Kilongo in lat. 4° 24' S. Long. 11° 22' E., the slave Felucca, Name Unknown, but supposed to be El Golfin, condemned 28 Jan 1850 at the Vice-Admiralty Court, at St. Helena. After being surveyed, following capture, the vessel was declared unseaworthy, and was burnt, the figurehead having been removed for adjudication.

26 Dec 1849 detained off the West Coast of Africa in lat. 11° 53' S. Long. 12° 58' E., the Brazilian slave brigantine Deos te Salve, master, Fermino José Xavier Soares, which was taken to St Helena where her case was adjudicated and she was condemned on 28 Jan 1850 by the Vice-Admiralty Court.

3 Mar 1850 detained off the West Coast of Africa in lat. 10° 0' S. long. 12° 30' E., the slave brig Encarnacion, condemned 30 Mar 1850 at the Vice-Admiralty Court, at St. Helena.

14 Aug 1850 detained in lat. 11° 57' S. Long. 11° 41' E., the Brazilian slave brig Anna (late Pedro Grande).

10 Mar 1851 Tonnage bounties and proceeds of sale of the Despique, now payable.

25 Nov 1851 at Lagos, ineffective operations against the usurping King Kosoko. No killed or wounded. See p. 367-> at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow

1 Dec 1851 departed from off Lagos for Prince's Island, having supplied the Harlequin with all the water she could spare.

23 Dec 1851 at Lagos, operations recommenced against the usurping King Kosoko with a view to reinstating King Akitoye - see p. 368-> at www.archive.org/details/royalnavyhistory06clow

16 Dec 1852 detained off Quicombo following a 4 hour chase by the Waterwitch and her boats, a slave brigantine, Name Unknown, supposed Gallina, which was sent for adjudication to the Vice-Admiralty Court at St. Helena and on 10 Jan 1853 sentenced to be forfeited, per 2 & 3 Vict., cap. 73.

12 Aug 1853 Rear Adm. Bruce arrived off Lagos and found the Polyphemus, just returned from Sierra Leone, and Waterwitch, and was informed by Commander Phillips, of the former, "that great disturbance prevailed in the town of Lagos, two of King Akitoye's chief's having risen in open rebellion against him ; that Cdr. Gardner was up the river for the protection of British interests. Cdr. Gardner having seen the Penelope arrive, hastened down the river and informed me of the state of affairs at Lagos; that general consternation prevailed, and that the dispossessed chief, Kosoko, with a multitude of armed men and several large war-canoes, was within a few miles from the place."

13 Aug 1853 sent Cdr. Phillips with the boats of the Penelope, Polyphemus, and Waterwitch, supported by Commander Gardner and Acting-Commander Leikie, Lieutenants Strickland, Curtis, and Ruxton, to Lagos, "to support and protect the English and the King Akitoye. On entering the river, Commander Phillips was informed that Kosoko and his people had made good his footing in the town, and in conformity with his instructions, he immediately opened fire upon the house and position where they were known to be, and so effectually dislodged them by a few shot and shells that they all at once fled," in their canoes, which conveyed them away beyond our reach as night fell.

Commander Phillips who wrote to Rear Admiral Bruce, as follows:
"H.M.'s Steam Sloop Polyphemus, Lagos Roads, August 14, 1853.
Sir, Yesterday evening, the force you did me the honour to place under my command arrived off Lagos, which I found in terror and confusion, in consequence of the usurper Kosoko having, by the treachery of the Caboceers, A'Pellu and Aginea, established himself in force within musket-shot of the quarters of our ally, King Akitoye.
......I got the boats into position as fast as they came up, and just as darkness set in opened on the enemy's position with shot and shell ; a few minutes sent them flying out of it, and Akitoye's friends, deriving encouragement from our very forcible demonstration, fired their buildings, seized much of their property, and by daylight had driven them off the island, with such a loss of killed, wounded, and captives, as will, I hope, remove the impediments that have so long existed to deprive Lagos of the advantages our country has been striving to secure it.
By 2 p.m. on this day, Akitoye's authority was so completely restored that I was enabled to direct the boats to return to their ships. The local experience of Commander Gardner, of the Waterwitch, was of the greatest assistance to me, and the conduct of the officers and men engaged with me was such as deserves my thanks and acknowledgments. I have, &c. (Signed) C. Gerrans Phillips.

5 Sep 1853 Commander Gardner, of the Waterwitch, entered the river opposite Lagos with the armed boats, and saluted Ducimo, the new King of Lagos.

8-9 Sep 1853 Report to Rear Adm. Bruce by C. Gerrans Phillips, H.M.'s Sloop Polyphemus, off Lagos reads : "On my return from a cruize on the 8th instant, I was informed by the Consul, that a division of Kosoko's canoes were in sight off Lagos, on the Lake, stopping the trade, and cutting off supplies of provisions ; and earnestly requested me to make a demonstration against them. I therefore entered the river on the 9th instant with the boats of this ship, and those of the Waterwitch and Athol, and being joined by the war canoes of Lagos, tracked the marauders into a narrow creek, up which I forced my way with grape, canister and musketry for about a mile, the enemy making a very respectable defence till driven out of a village called Madjidoo into the interior, abandoning a great number of canoes, which were captured or destroyed by our Black allies, and the village committed to the flames. Commander A. H. Gardner, of H. M. ship Waterwitch, Lieutenant W. Strickland, of this ship, Lieutenant H. B. Johnstone, of the Waterwitch, and all the officers and men under my command deserve my best thanks for the steady and determined support they rendered me, and the perfect style in which their boats and guns were worked in single column up a very narrow creek, against the fire of foes hardly to be seen through the cover. A seaman of this ship, and a private marine of the Waterwitch, were wounded by the enemy's fire, but not dangerously. "

10 Oct 1853 the boats of the Polyphemus, Waterwitch, and Alecto crossed the bar to Lagos where they were joined by African warriors before sailing for Eginna in order to destroy the slave market set up by Kosoko. 2 men from the Alecto died during the operation.

1860 Sheerness, 8 guns.