Contents
 
Boy's Manual of Seamanship and Gunnery

Sail Instruction

Part II

Now that it has become a general practice throughout the service to stow courses and topsails away in the sail-room, furled, ready for bending, the gaskets are sewed in the head-rope of the sail fur this purpose, and the bending strop is seized in place, ready for hooking the sail tackle to.

A Bending Strop

Is simply a pair of bail slings, only unlike slings, one bight is not rove through the other, but merely seized together with spunyarn when in use. The strop or slings are passed round the bunt of the sail after it is made up for bending, one bight is passed down abaft the sail, up before all, and seized to both parts of the other bights, sufficient length being left on the upper bight for hooking the sail tackle to. This plan of fitting a bending strop is not, however, very safe, as everything depends on the seizing.

The bending strop is sometimes seized to the head rope of the sail, as well as to act as a preventer in the event of the other seizing slipping or carrying away ; but the best and securest plan of fitting it, is to have two eyelet-holes worked in the head of the sail, just below the head rope, the sail being strengthened in the wake of the eyelet-hole by a patch of canvas. Cut the bending strop to length, reeve it from aft forward, through one hole, then from forward aft, through the other hole, splice both ends together, thus the splice will be on the after part of the sail ; when covered with canvas, a strop fitted this way can scarcely be seen, and is always in place; it is generally drawn through the eyelet-holes when the sail is set close to the foremost bight, and hangs down abaft all ; in furling, it is tucked in the sail out of sight.

When used for bending, it is rendered through the eyelet-holes, the night on the after part of the sail being passed round the bunt of the sail, up before all, and seized to both parts of the bight on the foremost part of the sail ; for this purpose the strops or slings are marked and seized each side of the eyelet-hole, to prevent it slipping, leaving sufficient length on the bight on the fore part of the sail for hooking the sail tackle to. A strop fitted this way, for all the seizing might slip or carry away, would never allow the sail to fall on deck.

To Furl a Course on Deck for Bending or Shifting.

Stretch the sail taut along the roping next the deck, hitch the earring to any convenient place, to keep the head taut. Gather all the slack sail over towards the foot, then lay the second reef-band on the head, haul the second reef-earring taut out. Bring the leech taut in as far as the inner leechline cringles, leaving the toggles out over the head ready for bending the leechline, and if a fore course, leave the bowline cringle out to bend the bowline.

Bring the clews in over the head of the sail, about 4 ft. from the midship roband on either side, then lay the buntline toggles abort a foot over the head, between the clews, ready for bending the buntlines to.

Extend the hands along the head of the sail, as if they were on the yard, and gather up, as in furling, until they come to the skin, then all step across the sail again, kneel down, and roll it taut up, making a snug furl, pass the gaskets, footing them well taut, pass the bending strop, and seize it in place ready for hooking the stay-tackle to. Stretch the head-earring along the head rope, as near the bunt as possible, and stop them, ready to be got hold of as soon at the sail is above the fore or main yard.

The sail is now ready for bending or stowing away.

Q. How do, you furl a topsail on deck for bending or shifting?

A. Stretch the sail taut along the roping or after part of the sail next the deck.

Gather all the slack sail over towards the foot, then lay the second reef band along the head, stopping the second reef-cringle to the head-earring cringle. Get hold of the head-earrings, and tauten the head of the sail. Bowline-knot the third reef-earring in the second reef-cringle, and the fourth reef-earring in the third reef-cringle, take the two clews in about 6 ft. over the head, and about 4 ft. on either side of the midship roband ; by having the clews well out, it will be easier to bend the sheets and clewlines. Bring the leech in along the head as far as the reef-tackle cringles, leaving out the reef-tackle pendants and bowline-toggles, at least, a foot over the head rope, then bring the buntline-toggle is between the clews, leaving them also a foot over the head-rope, ready for bending the buntlines, extend the hands along the head rope, as if on the yard, and gather all the slack sail into the skin, leaving the yard-arms as light as possible, and, at the same time, making a shapely bunt, step across the sail and face about, kneel down, and roll the sail taut up in the skin, pass the gaskets and foot them taut, then bring the clews up under the fore part of the sail and stop them to the head rope abaft all. Pass the bending strop, and seize it in place, ready for hooking the sail tackle to.

Stretch the head-earrings along the head-rope, and stop them as near the bunt as possible, so they can be got hold of readily, directly the sail is above the top.

The sail is now ready for bending or stowing away.

Q. How do you make a jib up for bending or shifting ?

A. Stretch the foot along the roping or port side next the deck, making the sail up in folds on the foot, leaving the luff rope out, and all parts of the lacing clear. Take the bight of the tack-lashing round all parts of the sail, and hitch it to its own part, or secure it with a seizing.

Q. How do you make a course up for stowing away (not furled) ?

A. Stretch the sail taut along the roping next the deck. Gather the slack sail over towards the foot. Bring the second reef-band, belly-band, and foot in, and taut along the head rope, laying the leech rope of each inside the other. Leave the robands and gaskets out. Bring the clews in towards the bunt, as far as possible, so as to leave out at the leech or ends of the sail, when made up, the reef-tackle cringles, bowlines, and leech-line toggles, then carry the clew out again, and leave them out also. Carry the buntline-toggles over the head rope, and leave them out.

Q. How do you make a topsail up for stowing in the bins (not furled) ?

A. Stretch the sail taut along the roping or after part next the deck. Gather the slack sail over towards the foot, then lay the third reef-band, belly-band, and foot rope, along the head rope, laying the leech rope of each inside the other. See all the robands, gaskets, reef-tackle cringles, bowline, and buntline-toggles, and clews out, the third reef-earring bowline knotted in the second reef-cringle, and the fourth reef-earring in the third reef-cringle. Bring the clews in towards the bunt, so as still to leave the bowline-toggles out at the leech, take them out to the leech again, thus having all parts of the sail inside the leech ropes. The robands, gaskets, and buntline-toggles out at the head, the clews, reef-tackle cringles, and bowline-toggles at the sides.

Extend the hands along the sail facing the head, kneel down, and roll it taut up, securing it with the gaskets or spunyarn stops if required.

Stretch the head-earring along the head, and secure them as near the bunt as possible, so as the men in the tops can readily get hold of them when bending. Seize the bending strop in place, and the sail is ready for stowing away.

Q. How are topgallantsails and royals made up for stowing away ?

A. Stretch the head of the sail taut along the roping or after part next the deck. Gather all the slack sail over towards the foot, then carry the sail towards the head in a similar way to a topsail or course, making three folds of it. Bring the clews towards the bunt till the leech rope of each fold lays inside the leech rope of the other ; then take the clews out over the leech rope again, roll the sail taut up, leaving the robands out, and the bight of the head-earring hitched road the sail. Secure the sail with ropeyarn stops. It is then ready for stowing away.

Q. How do you make gaff-topsails up for stowing away?

A. A gaff-topsail is made up on the head, the tack is brought in towards the head, so as to square the foot. The foot is then laid along the head rope, and the sail rolled taut up and stopped with spunyarn stop, ready for stowing away.

Q. How do you make a jib or staysail up for stowing away in the sail bins?

A. Stretch the after-leech along the roping or port side next the deck. Bring the head and tack towards the sheet, until it nearly forms a square, then roll up taut on the after-leech and secure it with ropeyarn stops ; the sail is then ready to stow away.

Q. How do you make a boom-mainsail, spanker, or trysail up, for stowing in the sail-room ?

A. On the after-leech ; double the head and foot in towards the middle of the sail, roll it up snugly, and secure it with ropeyarn stops, it is then ready for stowing away.

Q. How are studdingsails made up ?

A. Rolled taut upon the outer leech, secured with ropeyarn stops, and the tally is left out.

Q. How are boat's sails made up ?

A. Rolled taut up on the after-leech, secured with spunyarn strops, and the tallies left out. Avoid making boat-sails up on the head, as it stretches the sail in the heads, and spoils its set.

Q. How are awnings made up ?

A. Stretched taut along the deck, both parts brought together, and rolled taut up on the ridge rope, which is fitted with stops, for securing it.

^ back to top ^