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Naval History of Great Britain - Vol III
1801 Lord Nelson at Copenhagen 69

fair wind. Part of this night, as many others had been, was passed in active service. Captain Hardy proceeded in a small boat, to examine the channel between the British anchorage and the Danish line, and actually approached near enough to sound round the first ship of the latter ; using a pole, lest the noise of throwing the lead should lead to a discovery. On his return, at about 11 P.M., Captain Hardy went on board the Elephant, and reported the depth of water up to the Danish line. This assurance of the practicability of the channel was gratifying news to Lord Nelson, and prevented him from sleeping during the remainder of the night.

We will now endeavour to give a description of the formidable force, which was to be the object of the morning's attack. It consisted of two-decked ships, chiefly old and in a dismantled state, frigates, prames, and radeaus, mounting altogether 628 guns, as particularized in the following table

      Guns  
Denomination* Name Description of Vessel 36 † pds 24 pds 18 pds 12 pds 8 pds Total Men ‡
B. S. Provesteen An old three-decker cut down, dismantled and condemned 28 28       56 515
B. S. Wagner An old two-decker; quarter-deck cut down, condemned - 48 - - - 48 361
  Rensburg A prame for the transport of cavalry, with masts and sails - 20 - - - 20 216
Pr. Nyburg Ditto .. ditto - 20 - - - 20 209
B. S. Jutland An old two-docker condemned; with out poop or masts - 24 - 24 - 48 396
Rad. Suersishen Square floating battery, with masts     20     20 117
B. S. Cronburg An old condemned frigate; cut down and dismantled _ 22 _ - - 22 196
Rad. Hajen A square battery like the Suersishen - - 20 - - 20 155
B. S. Dannebrog An old condemned two-decker, cut down and dismantled - 24 - 24 14 62 336
sm.-ves. Elwen A small repeating vessel, rigged - 6 - -   6 80
Rad. Grenier's-float Old and without masts - 24     - 24 120
Pr. Aggerstans An old cav. transport, without masts - 20 - - - 20 213
gun-ship                  
74 Zealand A two-decker condition and unrigged - 30 30 - 14 74 529
B. S. Charl. Amelia A condemned Indiaman   26 - - - 26 225
Rad. Sohesten A square battery like the Suersishen   18       18 126
gun-ship                  
60 Holstein A two decker, newly repaired - 24 - 24 12 60 400
B. S. Indosforethen An old condemned two-docker, cut down and dismantled   26 - 26 12 64 390
Frigate Hielpern A good completely rigged ship or frig. 20   -   - 20 265
    Total: 48 360 70 98 52 628 4849

These 18 vessels were moored in a line from a mile to a mile and a half in extent; flanked at the north end, or that nearest the town, by two artificial or pile-formed islands, called the Trekroner batteries, one of thirty 24, the other of thirty-eight 36 pounders, with furnaces for heating shot; and both of which

* B. S. stands for block-ship, Pr. for prame, and Rad. for radeau.

† For the mode of equalizing the Danish and English calibers, see vol.i., p.42.

‡ Believed to be exclusive of soldiers and artillerymen.

[From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913): Praam \Praam\, n. [D. praam; cf. G. prahm, F. prame; all of Slavonic origin, from a word akin to E. fare. See {Fare}.] (Naut.) A flat-bottomed boat or lighter, -- used in Holland and the Baltic, and sometimes armed in case of war. [Written also {pram}, and {prame}.] ]

[From Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913): radeau: n. [F.] A float, a raft.]

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