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1813 Light Squadrons and Single Ships 166

was the precipitate flight of the French commandant, on observing the approach of the British brig, that he fled without destroying the artillery or powder.

On the 10th of July, at 10 a.m., the breaching batteries, raised by the army of General Graham on the Chope sand-hills, were opened against the walls of St.-Sebastian's; and a detachment of seamen was landed from Sir George Collier's squadron to co-operate in the attack, under the orders of the first lieutenant of the Surveillante, Dowell O'Reilly. The loss sustained by this detachment, up to the evening of the 21st of July, amounted to two seamen killed, Lieutenant Robert Graham Dunlop, and five seamen wounded. The squadron stationed off St.-Sebastian's consisted, besides the Surveillante, Lyra, and Sparrow, of the 38-gun frigates Révolutionnaire and Présidente, Captains John Charles Woolcombe and Francis Mason, brig sloops Beagle, Despatch, and Challenger, Captains John Smith, James Galloway, and Frederick Vernon, schooners Holly and Juniper, and two gun-boats.

On the 31st of August two divisions of boats from the squadron, placed under the orders of Captains Galloway and Bloye, were sent to make a demonstration on the back of the rock of St,-Sebastian's. The plan succeeded, and a large proportion of the garrison was diverted from the defence of the breach which, on the preceding day, had been made in the walls. The men-of-war brigs also weighed with a light breeze, and stood into the harbour. At 11 a.m. the assault by the breach took place, and at 1 h. 30 m. a.m. the town was entered and possessed ; but the citadel still held out. Captain Smith of the Beagle was slightly wounded, also three or four of the seamen. On the 8th of September the breaching and mortar batteries opened a most ruinous fire upon the castle of La Motte, or citadel of St.-Sebastian's ; and in a very short time General Rey, the governor, sent out a flag of truce to propose terms of capitulation, which were immediately agreed to. In addition to the ships already named, there were present co-operating in the attack, the 18-pounder 36-gun frigate Magicienne, Captain the Honourable William Gordon, and the gun-brig Constant, Lieutenant John Stokes. Among the naval officers who distinguished themselves on the occasion, Captain Sir George Collier names Lieutenant the Honourable James Arbuthnot of the Surveillante, also midshipmen Digby Marsh, George Harvey, Henry Bloye, and William Lawson.

On the 18th of March the British 38-gun frigate Undaunted, Captain Thomas Ussher, chased a tartan under the battery of Carri, situated about five leagues to the westward of Marseille. Light winds preventing the ship from getting up, Lieutenant Aaron Tozer offered his services to destroy the battery. The boats under his orders, assisted by Mr. Robert Clennan the master, acting Lieutenant Thomas Salkeld and Lieutenant of marines Harry Hunt, pushed off accordingly to execute the

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